Malaysian Applied Biology Journal

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48_04_08

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Malays. Appl. Biol. (2019) 48(4): 61–67

 

EFFECT OF MICROALGAL DIETS AND ITS BIOCHEMICAL

COMPOSITION ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF

ASIATIC FRESHWATER CLAM


WALEEWAN CHANGPASERT1*, SAOU-LIEN WONG1 and KITTIKOON TORPOL2


1Department of Aquaculture, National Pingtung University of Science and Technology,

No 1, Shuefu Road, Neipu, Pingtung 912, Taiwan

2Department of Biology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi,

39, Moo 1, Rangsit-Nakhonnayok Rd, Thanyaburi, Khlong Luang, Pathum Thani, 12110, Thailand

*E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Accepted 9 October 2019, Published online 30 November 2019

 

 

ABSTRACT

Corbicula fluminea clam is one of the most popular food ingredients and nutritional supplements in Taiwan. Increasing the biomass of the clam by culturing it with a proper diet is necessary. For the potential of food availability of the C. fluminea clam, growth and survival were studied by rearing five species of live microalgal diets for eight weeks. The results revealed that the clams fed on C. pyrenoidosa, O. multisporus and C. cryptica showed outstanding results in shell growth and live weight gain. The maximum percentage of clam growth rate, which was measured by shell length, live weight gain and survival rate were found when fed on C. pyrenoidosa, O. multisporus and C. cryptica, respectively. However, the clams had a negative live weight gain when fed on S. acutus and C. microporum, due to the inappropriate size of the diets. The most significant protein content in clam tissue was shown when fed on C. pyrenoidosa (58.34%), and C. cryptica stimulated the highest lipid content in clam tissue (25.06%). Therefore, it suggested that the most suitable live microalgal foods are C. pyrenoidosa, O. multisporus and C. cryptica, for which useful algae and non-toxic species were selected to support C. fluminea growth.


Key words: Algal diet, asiatic clam, biochemical composition

 

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Vol 48(4) November 2019

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