Malaysian Applied Biology Journal

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48_01_30

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Malays. Appl. Biol. (2019) 48(1): 215–220

 

AN INSIGHT ON THE FLORA SPECIES AND MEIOFAUNA

DISTRIBUTION AT PANTAI KELANANG MANGROVE FOREST,

MORIB, SELANGOR


MAZIAH MOHD GHAZALY1, MAIZAH M. ABDULLAH2, NUR SAYYIDAH AFIFAH MOHD RADIF1,

YUSRINA SAFURA GHAZALI1, SITI FATIMAH TAJUDDIN1, NUR HIDAYAH AHMAD PAUZI1

and RAZIFAH MOHD RAZALI1*


1School of Fundamental Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu,

21030 Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

2School of Marine and Environmental Science, Universiti Malaysia Terengganu,

21030 Kuala Nerus, Terengganu, Malaysia

*E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Accepted 1 February 2019, Published online 20 March 2019

 

ABSTRACT

Mangrove forest at Pantai Kelanang was famous for its diverse marine wildlife and various density of flora and meiofauna distributed at Morib shorelines. Moreover, the diverse marine wildlife, variation of flora and meiofauna distribution at Kelanang mangrove area has never been documented. Kelanang mangrove forest is also surrounded within heavy industrial activity zoning along the Malacca Straits. The objective of this study is to determine the diversity and distribution density of the mangrove flora and meiofauna at different intertidal zones influenced by prolonged human activities. Block sampling technique with quadrat analysis was used in this study. There are two major plants species belonging to Avicennia and Sonneratia families that have been discovered, where the average diameter at breast height was recorded between 3.3 to 32 cm and the average height ranged between 2.0 to 14.5 m. Whereas, Nematoda was found to be the largest distributed meiofauna compared to other meiofauna taxa such as Harpacticoida, Copepoda, Oligochaetea and Polychaetea. Flora species at Kelanang mangrove forest are less diverse at different intertidal zones and the meiofauna diversity were less at the mid- and high-intertidal zones. This finding may be a direct consequence of the influence of heavy industrial activities along the Malacca Straits.

Key words: Avicennia, sonneratia, nematoda, copepoda, oligochaetea and polychaetea

 

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