Malaysian Applied Biology Journal

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49_02_10

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Malays. Appl. Biol. (2020) 49(2): 63–67

 

TRANSPIRATION CAPABILITY OF SEVERAL LOWLAND

FOREST TREE SPECIES


IRSAN, M.F.1, SULISTYAWATI, E.1*, HADIYANE, A.1 and HIDAYATI, N.2


1Forestry Engineering Program, School of Life Sciences and Technology, Institut Teknologi Bandung,

Bandung, Indonesia, Jalan Ganesha No. 10 Bandung 40132

2Research Center for Biology, Indonesian Institute of Science,

Jalan Raya Jakarta-Bogor Km 46 Cibinong 16911

*E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Accepted 6 May 2020, Published online 6 July 2020


ABSTRACT

Plant transpiration is the key to restore the water balance of mining site. Plant transpiration will relate to water loss rate from the land, therefore the transpiration ability of plants can be used as one criterion on the selection of tree species for postmining land reclamation program. This research aimed to compare transpiration capability among selected tree species and to compare potential loss of water through transpiration and the rate of water input through rainfall. Seven native lowland rainforest species commonly found in the Bangka Belitung Islands were used in this research. We measured parameters affecting transpiration rates, i.e. stomatal conductance, leaf area index (LAI), and subsequently calculated canopy conductance and transpiration rates. The calculated transpiration rate of each species was Shorea leprosula (4.47 mm/day), Hopea odorata (3.93 mm/day), Aquilaria malaccensis (3.34 mm/day), Shorea javanica (2.59 mm/day), Terminalia catappa (2.01 mm/day), Flacourtia rukam (1.96 mm/day), and Eusideroxylon zwageri (1.35 mm/day). During the driest month, Shorea leprosula would have the highest potential of water loss through transpiration than that in other studied species.


Key words: Post-mining site, stomatal conductance, transpiration, Bangka Belitung native species

 

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